Electric Car Viability

The vast majority of individuals hold the false belief that electric cars are a modern invention, a fad brought on by increased awareness of the negative environmental impact of the use of fossil fuels. In fact, the use of electric cars predates that of those using an internal combustion engine by almost two decades. In 1884, the first electric car suitable for mass production was invented by Thomas Parker. It took nearly ten years after this invention for the first commercially viable electric cars to begin production in the United States. For several decades, the electric car proved superior to its gasoline using counterparts, providing consumers with an unmatched level of comfort and reliability. By approximately 1912, advancements in the development of internal combustion engines made gasoline using vehicles become more popular than electric cars. For the better part of one hundred years after this, electric cars were incredibly rare in the United States, with almost none being produced by manufacturers. Then in 2008, Tesla Motors sparked a renaissance in the electric car industry with their Roadster, proving to the world that electric cars (when manufactured and marketed appropriately) are a financially sound alternative to cars powered by an internal combustion engine. For almost an entire century, it was considered common knowledge that the use of electric cars was simply not economically viable for manufacturers and consumers. Although Tesla and their competitors have since proven that to be false, this assumption is still the prevailing view of the average individual …

Electric Vehicles

Electric Vehicles

Fossil fuels are used to produce more than eighty-five percent of the world’s energy. This is a state of affairs that can not continue for much longer, for a variety of reasons. First and foremost among them, is that fossil fuels are not a renewable resource. Eventually, the global supply will be exhausted, and it will take millions of years to begin replenishing that supply. Secondly, these fuels create carbon dioxide as a byproduct, releasing billions of tonnes of the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere each year. The damage being done to the environment by this reckless use of fossil fuels is becoming the driving force in the development of more efficient electric vehicles. The first electric motor was invented in 1827 by the Hungarian priest Ányos Jedlik and was used to power a small automobile. Less than twenty years later the first patents were being issued for locomotives powered by rails used to conduct electricity. Electric cars were not mass produced however until the early twentieth century, when the first electric cars capable of competing with gasoline powered vehicles entered the market. Unfortunately for the producers of these vehicles, Henry Ford’s implementation of mass production of his gas-powered cars significantly lowered the costs when compared to their electric counterparts. This status quo then lasted for nearly a hundred years. Electricity-powered trains have remained the norm throughout the years, and the technology involved has continually evolved in order to keep pace with internal combustion engines. Electric cars on the other …