Michelin Star

Approximately one hundred years ago, brothers Edouard and Andre Michelin published a guide for French motorists, in an attempt to increase the demand for both cars and tires. It contained maps, instructions on tire replacement, and the locations of mechanic shops and hotels. After twenty years, the focus of the Michelin Guide changed, now containing more information specifically about restaurants. The brothers hired people to go to these restaurants and report back on the quality of the establishments, and developed a system designed to rank them. By the mid-1930’s, this system was streamlined into a simple form, giving from one to three stars to restaurants deemed suitable. One star meant that the restaurant was good for the type of establishment it could be categorized in, such as a diner or a steakhouse. Two stars meant that the restaurant was good enough to merit a small detour, and the food was very good. And three stars meant that the restaurant was excellent, worth making an entire trip solely in order to eat at there. The first American version of the Michelin Guide was not released until 2005, containing reviews of upwards of five hundred restaurants. By 2013, the Michelin Guide covered more than twenty countries, with fourteen different editions in print. Famously, the Michelin reviewers sent out to inspect restaurants remain completely anonymous. They have no contact with any members of the press, and are encouraged not to tell even their own families about the work they do. They simply write …

Research Chef’s Association

The Research Chefs Association was founded in 1996, by a group of researchers and chefs working together in order to achieve their goals. They shared a vision, and dedicated their time and energy towards a scientific study of food preparation and development. The Research Chefs Association has many members who can be considered to be part of a movement in the culinary world known as molecular gastronomy. Molecular gastronomy is a discipline of the food science industry focused on the chemical and physical reaction that take place during the preparation of food for human consumption. But the Research Chefs Association has a wider focus than just molecular gastronomy, aiming to research all aspects of food science. This includes not just the actual cooking of food, but also the scientific principles and engineering behind the preparation of food, but the processing and storage of food products as well. Furthermore, the Research Chefs Association, or RCA, believes in developing an understanding of the business and regulatory aspects of the food industry as well. There are a variety of subjects that any individual member of the RCA can be expected to be familiar with, ranging from the presentation of a finished meal to the FDA regulations governing the food service industry. The RCA refers to their research and standards by the term Culinology, a trademarked term that refers to their aim of combining the culinary arts with the chemistry and biology that are needed to understand the principles of food science. A large …

Liquid Nitrogen

Food Trends – Liquid Nitrogen

Gastronomy in the modern era has evolved, technological developments turning the art of cooking into an exact science. It focuses on the physical and chemical reactions that occur during the cooking process, and how those reactions affect the aroma and flavor of the dishes being made. Sometimes referred to as molecular gastronomy, this scientific approach to making food is becoming more and more common as time passes. This can involve the use a variety of chemical compounds and devices, the most popular of which being liquid nitrogen. Nitrogen is the seventh element on the periodic table, and it makes up more than seventy-five percent of the air in the atmosphere. It is difficult to change nitrogen into its liquid form, as it only maintains that state between the temperatures of negative 346 and 320 degrees Fahrenheit. Because of these incredibly low temperatures, liquid nitrogen can cause extreme damage if ingested or applied directly to living tissue. Despite these challenges to an average cook, liquid nitrogen is gaining popularity among professionals and amateurs alike in order to freeze food. The first culinary use of liquid nitrogen goes back as far as the nineteenth century, mentioned in the recipe book Fancy Ices by Agnes Marshall. Due to the extremely cold temperature of the nitrogen, it is able to freeze foods pretty much instantaneously. The speed with which it does this freezing causes microscopic ice crystals to form, exponentially smaller than those created by the use of a conventional freezer. These smaller crystals …